June 23, 2017

Howard Schwartz – Colorado State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

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CO Commentary (08-10-12)

COLORADO Commentary
Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 08/10/12

Thrips pressure remains moderate to high in Eastern, Southern and Western Regions of the state. Risk Models show that Thrips and IYSV are at High Risk, while foliar bacterial and fungal threats remain at Medium Risk in most regions due to persistent high temperatures and low moisture conditions.

Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 08/10/12
Most regions of the state received little or no rain in the last week. Temperatures have averaged in the upper 80 to low 90s during the day, and upper 50s to mid 60s in the evening.
Temperature Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Normal
Precipitation Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Normal
*Courtesy of Planalytics, Inc.

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 08/10/12
Thrips – Surveys detected up to 60 (larvae + adult) thrips in commercial fields on transplants or seeded onions.
Maggots – No reports at this time
Other – No other reports at this time.

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 08/10/12
Iris yellow spot virus – IYSV detected in surveys of transplanted and seeded onions (trace to more than 50%) sampled in northern and southern regions.

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium) – Pink Root observed in numerous fields of transplanted and seeded onions in Colorado. Fusarium basal rot becoming more common in affected fields throughout the state.

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis) – No reports at this time

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots) – Surveys from all regions detected trace soft rot and leaf blight infections.

State Contact for Project Howard Schwartz Professor of Plant Pathology Colorado State University Email:howard.schwartz@colostate.edu
Collaborators: Whitney Cranshaw, Ned Tisserat, Stephanie Szostek, Janet Hardin,
Mike Bartolo, Thad Gourd, Bob Hammon, Colorado Onion Association

Howard Schwartz – Colorado State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

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CO Commentary (07-27-12)

COLORADO Commentary
Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 07/27/12
Thrips pressure remains moderate to high in Eastern, Southern and Western Regions of the state. Risk Models show that Thrips and IYSV are at High Risk, while foliar bacterial and fungal threats remain at Medium Risk in most regions due to persistent high temperatures and low moisture conditions.

Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 07/27/12
Most regions of the state received little or no rain in the last week. Temperatures have averaged in the upper 80 to low 90s during the day, and upper 50s to mid 60s in the evening.
Temperature Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Above Normal
Precipitation Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Below Normal
*Courtesy of Planalytics, Inc.

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 07/13/12
Thrips – Surveys detected up to 60 (larvae + adult) thrips in commercial fields on transplants or seeded onions.
Maggots – No reports at this time
Other – No other reports at this time.

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 07/27/12
Iris yellow spot virus – IYSV detected in surveys of transplanted and seeded onions (trace to nearly 40%) sampled in northern and southern regions.
Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium) – Pink Root was confirmed in 10 % of seeded onions sampled in northern and southern Colorado recently. Fusarium basal rot present at less than 5% in affected fields throughout the state.
Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis) – No reports at this time
Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots) – Surveys from all regions detected trace soft rot and leaf blight infections.

State Contact for Project Howard Schwartz Professor of Plant Pathology Colorado State University Email:howard.schwartz@colostate.edu
Collaborators: Whitney Cranshaw, Ned Tisserat, Stephanie Szostek, Janet Hardin,
Mike Bartolo, Thad Gourd, Bob Hammon, Colorado Onion Association

 

Howard Schwartz – Colorado State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

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CO Commentary (07-13-12)

COLORADO Commentary
Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 07/13/12
Thrips pressure continues to build in Eastern, Southern and Western Regions of the state. Pink Root confirmed in northern and southern Colorado, along with a trace of Phytoplasma in transplants. Risk Models show that Thrips and IYSV are at High Risk, while foliar bacterial and fungal threats remain at Low to Medium Risk in most regions.
Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 07/13/12
The northern region received 1 – 3 inches of rain last week, and other regions of the state received less than 0.25 inches or no rain. Temperatures have averaged in the upper 80 to low 90s during the day, and upper 50s to mid 60s in the evening.
Temperature Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Above Normal
Precipitation Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Below Normal
*Courtesy of Planalytics, Inc.

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 07/13/12
Thrips – Surveys detected up to 60 (larvae + adult) thrips in commercial fields on transplants or seeded onions.
Maggots – No surveys or reports at this time
Other – No new reports at this time.

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 07/13/12
Iris yellow spot virus – IYSV detected in surveys of transplanted and seeded onions (trace to nearly 40% ) sampled in northern and southern regions.

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium) – Pink Root was confirmed in 10 % of seeded onions sampled in northern and southern Colorado recently. Fusarium basal rot present at less than 1% in many transplanted fields in the northern region.

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis) – No surveys or reports at this time

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots) – Samples (< 1%) from southern and northern transplants infected by a Phytoplasma (leafhopper transmitted) earlier this season during warm dry spring conditions. Samples sent to AgDIA for confirmation – results confirmed.

State Contact for Project Howard Schwartz Professor of Plant Pathology Colorado State University Email:howard.schwartz@colostate.edu
Collaborators: Whitney Cranshaw, Ned Tisserat, Stephanie Szostek, Janet Hardin,
Mike Bartolo, Thad Gourd, Bob Hammon, Colorado Onion Association

Howard Schwartz – Colorado State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

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CO Commentary (06-28-12)

COLORADO Commentary
Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 06/28/12
Warm, dry conditions persist throughout Colorado, with few reports of any storm damage
occurring in onion regions. Thrips pressure continues to build in Eastern, Southern and Western
Regions of the state. Pink Root confirmed in northern Colorado (10 %).

Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 06/28/12
The northern region has received very little rain in recent weeks, and other regions of the state
received less than 0.25 inches or no rain. Temperatures have averaged in the mid 80 to low 90s
during the day, and low to mid 50s in the evening.
Temperature Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Above Normal
Precipitation Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Below Normal
*Courtesy of Planalytics, Inc.

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/28/12
Thrips – Surveys detected up to 25, 50 and 10 (larvae + adult) thrips in northern, southern and
western regions, respectively on transplants or seeded. Thad noted that thrips congregated in the
neck region when temperatures were less than the low 80s, but climbed 2–4 inches up leaves as
temperatures increased; questioned whether this be used for timing of insecticide applications.
Beneficials included black hunter thrips, minute pirate bugs, lady bird beetles and big-eyed bugs.

Maggots – No surveys or reports at this time
Other – No new reports at this time.

Iris yellow spot virus – IYSV detected in surveys of transplanted onions (more than 50% at one
site) sampled in the northern region.

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium) – Pink Root was confirmed in 10 %
of seeded onions sampled in northern Colorado last week.
Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis) – No surveys or reports at this time

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots) – Samples from southern and northern
transplants may have been infected by a Phytoplasma (leafhopper transmitted) earlier this season
during warm dry spring conditions. Samples sent to AgDIA for confirmation – results pending.
State Contact for Project

Howard Schwartz
Professor of Plant Pathology
Colorado State University
Email:howard.schwartz@colostate.edu
Collaborators: Whitney Cranshaw, Ned Tisserat, Stephanie Szostek, Janet Hardin,
Mike Bartolo, Thad Gourd, Bob Hammon, Colorado Onion Association

Onion ipmPIPE Project

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The ONION ipmPIPE was developed in response to stakeholder demands for a coordinated and comprehensive website where onion farmers and agricultural professionals could obtain: 1) real-time information on the distribution and severity of priority diseases and insect pests in North America; 2) time-sensitive disease risk assessments; 3) information on disease and insect pest management options and 4) links to other important tools on onion production and pest management.   Stakeholders are advised of the status of priority diseases and insect pests through observational maps and national/state commentaries on a public website.  This allows all state commentaries/observations within reach in one website.

Emphasis is on  Onion (green, transplanted, seeded, storage, processed); and other alliums such as garlic & chives benefit from research on pests and diseases.  Priority Diseases and Insect Pests include: Iris yellow spot virus (IYSV); Thrips (emphasis on onion thrips) – as a vector of IYSV and a pest;  Other insects such as onion maggot;  Foliar & storage fungal diseases including Botrytis, Purple Blotch, Downy Mildew, Blue Mold, Black Mold; and Foliar & Storage bacterial diseases including Xanthomonas Leaf Blight, Sour Skin, Slippery Skin, Pantoea, Soft Rots.

A national team of onion experts, growers and industry representatives have created a unique on-line resource that will enhance the production, pest management, storage, and marketing of this vital food product for the consuming public in the United States and internationally.  This multi-year project is funded in part by the USDA’s Specialty Crop Research Initiative established by the 2008 Farm Bill; and has been endorsed by state and national onion organizations throughout all major onion-producing regions of the country.

Howard Schwartz – Colorado State Commentary Onion ipmPIPE

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CO Commentary (06-14-12)

 

COLORADO Commentary

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 06/14/12

Warm, dry conditions persist throughout Colorado, with few reports of any storm damage occurring in onion regions. Thrips pressure continues to build in Eastern, Southern and Western Regions of the state. Pink Root confirmed in southern Colorado (6 %); and beet armyworm was recovered from all 5 plant samples in western Colorado.

Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 06/14/12

The northern region has received very little rain in recent weeks, and other regions of the state received less than 0.25 inches or no rain. Temperatures have averaged in the mid 80 to low 90s during the day, and low to mid 50s in the evening.

Temperature Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Above Normal

Precipitation Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Below Normal

*Courtesy of Planalytics, Inc.

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/14/12

Thrips – Initial surveys in the northern region detected 3 to 28 (larvae + adult) in northern, 10 in southern and 6 thrips / plant in western regions on transplants or seeded.

Maggots – No surveys or reports at this time

Other – Beet armyworm recovered from 5 of 5 plant samples on the west slope.

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/14/12

Iris yellow spot virus – IYSV not detected in surveys of transplanted or seeded onions sampled in southern, northern and southern regions at this time.

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium) – Pink Root was confirmed in 6 % of seeded onions sampled in southern Colorado, but no reports from northern or southern regions at this time.

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis) – No surveys or reports at this time

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots) – No surveys or reports at this time

State Contact for Project Howard Schwartz Professor of Plant Pathology Colorado State University Email:howard.schwartz@colostate.edu

Collaborators: Whitney Cranshaw, Ned Tisserat, Stephanie Szostek, Janet Hardin,

Mike Bartolo, Thad Gourd, Bob Hammon, Colorado Onion Association

Howard Schwartz – Colorado

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CO Commentary (06-04-12)

COLORADO Commentary


Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 06/04/12
Warm, dry conditions persist throughout Colorado, with few reports of any storm damage occurring in onion regions.
Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 06/04/12
The northern region has received very little rain in recent weeks, and other regions of the state received less than 0.25 inches or no rain. Temperatures have average in the mid 80 to low 90s during the day, and low to mid 50s in the evening.
Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/04/12
Thrips
Initial surveys in the northern region detected 5 – 30 thrips (larvae + adult) on transplants. Seeded onion survey will begin soon, but low numbers of thrips per plant are anticipated.
Maggots
No surveys or reports at this time
Other
No surveys or reports at this time
Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/04/12
Iris yellow spot virus
No reports at this time
Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium)
No surveys or reports at this time
Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis)
No surveys or reports at this time
Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots)
No surveys or reports at this time
Onion Specialist Howard Schwartz Professor of Plant Pathology Colorado State University Email:howard.schwartz@colostate.edu

Howard Schwartz – Colorado

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COLORADO Commentary
Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 05/16/12
Onion plantings complete in eastern, southern and western Colorado; approximately 7,000 acres
were planted statewide in 2012. Warm, dry conditions persist throughout Colorado, with
required irrigation with well water (salinity potential) until canal system is charged.
Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 05/16/12
The northern region has received very little rain in recent weeks, and other regions of the state
received less than 0.25 inches or no rain. Some regions experienced low night temperatures (mid
to upper 20) in April; and this could influence the incidence of bolting in some transplanted
varieties during bulbing.
Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 05/16/12
Thrips
Initial surveys in the northern region detected 1 – 3 thrips (larvae + adult) on transplants.
Maggots
No surveys or reports at this time
Other
No surveys or reports at this time
Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 05/16/12
Iris yellow spot virus
No surveys or reports at this time
Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium)
No surveys or reports at this time
Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis)
No surveys or reports at this time
Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots)
No surveys or reports at this time
Onion Specialist
Howard Schwartz
Professor of Plant Pathology
Colorado State University
Email:howard.schwartz@colostate.edu

Howard Schwartz – Colorado

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September 15, 2011 Lower temperatures and rain occurred in most onion regions, and may contribute to late-season problems with bacterial and fungal diseases in the field and storage. aggravate some late-season fungal problems in seeded fields.

Howard Schwartz – Colorado

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September 6, 2011 Lower temperatures are forecast for the upcoming week, and could aggravate some late-season fungal problems in seeded fields.