June 24, 2017

Brian Nault – NY State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

onion-clean-FD-lg

2012 -NY Report – August 24

Onion ipmPIPE website regional report

 

New York State Report  – August 24, 2012

 

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status:

Most onions have matured two to three weeks earlier than normal and all leaves are down.  Fields continue to be harvested and in most cases bulb size has been smaller than desired, but quality continues to be excellent.

 

Weather impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing):

Still drier than normal, but temperatures have been normal.

 

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Maggots:  None observed from third generation.

Thrips:  Thrips pressure is high only in the few fields that are not yet mature.  The dry and hot growing season was the perfect recipe for a bad year for thrips.  Despite this challenge, most growers were successful in managing thrips with the available insecticides and IRM guidelines for using them.

 

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Iris yellow spot virus:  Yes, IYSV was observed along field edges before crop maturation.  The shorter than anticipated growth of the onion crop truncated the spread of IYSV within and among onion fields.  Consequently, the incidence of IYSV in New York onion fields was considered mild this season.

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping-off, pink root, Fusarium basal rot):  none reported

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis leaf blight):  Botrytis leaf blight (BLB) is uncommon, while purple blotch incidence is moderate to high in spots.  Downy mildew is not present.  Growers are using Bravo and Scala for disease control.

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots):  Present at low levels in some fields.

 

 

New York State report filed by:

Brian A. Nault, Dept. of Entomology, Cornell University

Email:  ban6@cornell.edu

Phone:  315-787-2354

 

Comments by others in New York State included in this report:

Christy Hoepting, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Albion, NY

Email:  cah59@cornell.edu

 

Brian Nault – NY State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

onion-clean-FD-lg

2012 -NY Report – August 8

 

Onion ipmPIPE website regional report

 

New York State Report  – August 8, 2012

 

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status:

Onions continue to mature earlier than normal, presumably a consequence of the drought and high temperatures during June and July.  Early-maturing varieties continue to be harvested.  Bulb size has been smaller than normal, but quality has been excellent.

 

Weather impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing):

Still drier than usual, but some locations have received some rain within the past week or so.  Temperatures have been normal.

 

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Maggots:  None observed from third generation.

Thrips:  Thrips pressure continues to be high in spots, especially in fields near those that have matured and are harvested.  Most growers have sprayed 5 to 6 times, mostly with Movento, AgriMek, Lannate and some with Radiant.  Movento and Radiant have worked very well.  AgriMek and Lannate have done well when pressure is low to moderate, but not done as well under high pressure.

 

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Iris yellow spot virus:  Yes, within the past week to 10 days.  Fields are beginning to show mild symptoms of IYSV, especially along edges.

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping-off, pink root, Fusarium basal rot):  none reported

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis leaf blight):  Botrytis leaf blight (BLB) is not common;  purple blotch incidence is low and downy mildew not present.  Growers are using Bravo and Scala for disease control.

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots):  Present at very low levels in some fields.

 

 

New York State report filed by:

Brian A. Nault, Dept. of Entomology, Cornell University

Email:  ban6@cornell.edu

Phone:  315-787-2354

 

Comments by others in New York State included in this report:

Christy Hoepting, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Albion, NY

Email:  cah59@cornell.edu

 

Brian Nault – NY State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

onion-clean-FD-lg

2012 -NY Report – July 30

Onion ipmPIPE website regional report

 

New York State Report  – July 30, 2012

 

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status:

Onions are still very dry in most locations and many have started maturing earlier than normal, presumably because of drought and high temperatures.  Most onion acreage is not irrigated. Some early varieties have been harvested.  Quality has been very good, but size is a bit smaller than expected.

 

Weather impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing):

Still on the dry side.  Temperatures have been near normal, but rainfall continues to be several inches below normal.

 

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Maggots:  None observed from second generation.

Thrips:  Thrips pressure is still relatively high.  Most growers have sprayed 4 to 6 times, mostly with Movento, AgriMek, Lannate and some Radiant.  Movento and Radiant have worked very well, whereas AgriMek and Lannate have not done well under high pressure.

 

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Iris yellow spot virus:  none observed

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping-off, pink root, Fusarium basal rot):  none reported

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis leaf blight):  Botrytis leaf blight (BLB) incidence is low.  Other fungal diseases are not common yet.

 

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots):  uncommon

New York State report filed by:

Brian A. Nault, Dept. of Entomology, Cornell University

Email:  ban6@cornell.edu

Phone:  315-787-2354

 

Comments by others in New York State included in this report:

Christy Hoepting, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Albion, NY

Email:  cah59@cornell.edu

 

Brian Nault – NY State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

onion-clean-FD-lg

2012 -NY Report – July 19

Onion ipmPIPE website regional report

 

New York State Report  – July 19, 2012

 

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status:

Onions are very dry and growing slowly.  Some have started maturing earlier than normal, presumably because of the drought and high temperatures.  Many onion acres are not irrigated. Some early varieties have been harvested.  Quality is excellent, but size is a bit smaller than expected.

 

Weather impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing):

Hot and dry.  Over the past several weeks, temperatures have been higher than average and rainfall several inches below normal.

 

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Maggots:  None observed from second generation.

Thrips:  Thrips pressure is very high.  Most growers have sprayed 2 to 4 times already, mostly with Movento and AgriMek.  Movento worked very well and AgriMek should hold populations from exploding.

 

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Iris yellow spot virus:  none observed

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping-off, pink root, Fusarium basal rot):  none reported

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis leaf blight):  Botrytis leaf blight (BLB) incidence is way down.  Other fungal diseases are not common.

 

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots):  uncommon

New York State report filed by:

Brian A. Nault, Dept. of Entomology, Cornell University

Email:  ban6@cornell.edu

Phone:  315-787-2354

 

Comments by others in New York State included in this report:

Christy Hoepting, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Albion, NY

Email:  cah59@cornell.edu

 

Brian Nault – NY State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

onion-clean-FD-lg

2012 -NY Report – July 4

Onion ipmPIPE website regional report

 

New York State Report  – July 4, 2012

 

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status:

Onions are growing well, but could use some water.  Early-planted onions have 10 to 11 leaves, while late-planted ones have 4 to 8 leaves.

 

Weather impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing):

Hot and dry.  Over the past couple of weeks, temperatures have been above normal and precipitation much below normal.

 

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Maggots:  First-generation onion maggot damage is over.  No evidence of second-generation damage at this time.

Thrips:  All onion fields are infested with onion thrips.  All growers have been applying insecticides to manage infestations and control has been effective.  Most growers have applied Movento for their first 2 sprays.  Inclusion of a penetrating surfactant with Movento has been very important.  Also, many growers avoided tank mixing clorothalonil with Movento.  A few other growers have followed the applications of Movento with either Agri-Mek or Lannate.

 

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Iris yellow spot virus:  none observed

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping-off, pink root, Fusarium basal rot):  none reported

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis leaf blight):  Botrytis leaf blight (BLB) is still common, but incidence has dropped considerably with the dry weather.  Very little incidence of other fungal pathogens at this time.

 

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots):  Almost non-existent at this point.

 

 

 

New York State report filed by:

Brian A. Nault, Dept. of Entomology, Cornell University

Email:  ban6@cornell.edu

Phone:  315-787-2354

 

Comments by others in New York State included in this report:

Christy Hoepting, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Albion, NY

Email:  cah59@cornell.edu

 

Brian Nault – NY State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

onion-clean-FD-lg

2012 -NY Report – June 18

Onion ipmPIPE website regional report

 

New York State Report  – June 18, 2012

 

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status:

Onions are growing well.  Some transplanted onions have 10 to 11 leaves.  Direct-seeded onion fields range from 2 to 6 leaves.

 

Weather impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing):

Moderate.  Over the past couple of weeks, temperatures have been relatively normal.  Similarly, rainfall has been somewhat normal.

 

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Maggots:  Onion maggot damage is subsiding in most places as we near the end of the first generation – 2 weeks earlier than normal.

Thrips:  Adults can be readily found in transplanted fields, while few adults have been observed in direct-seeded fields.  Some transplanted fields received their first spray last week.

 

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Iris yellow spot virus:  none observed

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping-off, pink root, Fusarium basal rot):  none reported

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis leaf blight):  Botrytis leaf blight (BLB) is common with anywhere from less than one to over 20 lesions per leaf.  Growers have continued using foliar applications of fungicides for BLB control in Upstate NY.

 

 

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots):  none

New York State report filed by:

Brian A. Nault, Dept. of Entomology, Cornell University

Email:  ban6@cornell.edu

Phone:  315-787-2354

 

Comments by others in New York State included in this report:

Christy Hoepting, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Albion, NY

Email:  cah59@cornell.edu

 

Lindsey du Toit – WA State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

onion_flowers

 

2012 WA Commentary 6-16-2012

WASHINGTON and OREGON Columbia Basin Onion Commentary
Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 06/16/12
Overall, onion crops in the Columbia Basin look good (an average year). The crops look much better than
in the previous few seasons when spring was unusually cold and wet. However, there seem to be some
issues with overwintered sweet onion crops in the Walla Walla area of WA, with plants in some crops not
growing at the usual rates (less vigorous), but without other obvious symptoms.
Onion seed crops are progressing well (no major issues reported).
Volunteer potato plants are becoming a big problem in parts of the Columbia Basin because of a
mild winter allowing more tubers to survive to spring. Many fields have volunteer potatoes
growing from potato crops produced in the fields 2 years previously. A shortage of local supply
of the herbicides that work well for volunteer potato control has exacerbated the issue.
Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 06/16/12
June has continued to be relatively cool for central WA, but overall the onion crop is average or
slightly above average in terms of progress.
Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/16/12
Thrips
Thrips numbers are building quickly in crops that have not been treated with insecticides. Most
growers are applying their second application or maybe their first thrips-targeted insecticide.
Maggots
No further reports of problems since the last (6/01/12) report. Crops are beyond the susceptible
phase for this pest.
Other
No other insect surveys or reports at this time.
Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/16/12
Iris yellow spot virus
Some IYSV present in overwintered onion crops in the south Basin, but nothing significant.
Soil-borne Diseases (damping-off, pink root, Fusarium, Rhizoctonia)
Patches continue to become more evident from Rhizoctonia infection in bulb crops grown on
very sandy fields in the south Basin (northcentral OR and southcentral WA) in rotation with
cereal cover crops that are killed out with herbicides (the fungus grows on decomposing cereal
roots and colonizes onion roots growing through the cereal residues/roots).
Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis)
Some lower scape blight problems reported in onion seed crops in the Columbia Basin, where
infection develops beneath the drying leaf sheath surrounding the base of the scape. Sporulation
is difficult to see without pulling back the dried leaf sheath to see the location of infection on the
scape, so the problem has been misidentified in several locations, affecting appropriate timing 2
and choice of fungicides for maximum efficacy. Lesions eventually girdle the lower scapes,
leading to inhibition of water and nutrient uptake, with scapes turning yellow as the plant feeds
the developing umbel/seed from resources stored in the scape because it cannot take up water or
nutrients from the soil. This can affect seed yield and quality.
Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots)
One sample from the south Columbia Basin (Oregon side) of general tip dieback, yellowing, and
watery appearance on upper 25% of leaf was identified by the National Onion Bacterial Lab as
Pantoea agglomerans. Pathogenicity tests will be run because the bacterium was only isolated
from 1 of 5 symptomatic plants, and not all isolates of this bacterium are pathogenic on onion.
Onion Specialist (submitted on behalf of WA/north-central OR onion participants)
Lindsey du Toit
Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, Washington State University,
Email: dutoit@wsu.edu, 360-848-6140

Brian Nault – NY State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

onion-clean-FD-lg

2012 -NY Report – June 4

Onion ipmPIPE website regional report

 

New York State Report  – June 18, 2012

 

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status:

Onions are growing well.  Some transplanted onions have 10 to 11 leaves.  Direct-seeded onion fields range from 2 to 6 leaves.

 

Weather impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing):

Moderate.  Over the past couple of weeks, temperatures have been relatively normal.  Similarly, rainfall has been somewhat normal.

 

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Maggots:  Onion maggot damage is subsiding in most places as we near the end of the first generation – 2 weeks earlier than normal.

Thrips:  Adults can be readily found in transplanted fields, while few adults have been observed in direct-seeded fields.  Some transplanted fields received their first spray last week.

 

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management: 

Iris yellow spot virus:  none observed

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping-off, pink root, Fusarium basal rot):  none reported

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis leaf blight):  Botrytis leaf blight (BLB) is common with anywhere from less than one to over 20 lesions per leaf.  Growers have continued using foliar applications of fungicides for BLB control in Upstate NY.

 

 

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots):  none

New York State report filed by:

Brian A. Nault, Dept. of Entomology, Cornell University

Email:  ban6@cornell.edu

Phone:  315-787-2354

 

Comments by others in New York State included in this report:

Christy Hoepting, Cornell Cooperative Extension, Albion, NY

Email:  cah59@cornell.edu

 

Lindsey du Toit – Washington

onion_flowers

WASHINGTON and OREGON Columbia Basin Onion Commentary
Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 05/17/12
Onion plantings complete in the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington States; estimated
20,000 acres planted. Spring-planted onion crops in the south Basin range from cotyledon to 3
true-leaf growth stage. Crops in the north Basin typically are further behind depending on
planting date. Onion seed crops fared well through the relatively mild winter and have bolted
(most at the stage of emerged but unopened umbels).
Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 05/17/12
April was the warmest in the past 5 months for the Columbia Basin of central WA/north-central
OR, although a fair amount of rain was received.
Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 05/17/12
Thrips
No monitoring yet. Tim Waters observed low numbers of thrips on some volunteer onions, and
anticipates populations may increase early this season because of warmer spring conditions.

Maggots
No surveys or reports at this time. Tim Waters has observed higher numbers of adult maggot
flies than usual in the south Columbia Basin, but it appears that onion growers’ standard maggot
management practices are effectively mitigating significant impact of the flies.

Other
No surveys or reports at this time.
Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 05/17/12

Iris yellow spot virus
No surveys or reports at this time
Soil-borne Diseases (damping-off, pink root, Fusarium, Rhizoctonia)
First evidence of patching developing in association with Rhizoctonia infection in bulb crops on
very sandy fields in the south Basin (northcentral OR and southcentral WA), particularly the
earlier planted fields.

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis)
No surveys or reports at this time.
Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots)
No surveys or reports at this time.

Onion Specialist (submitted on behalf of WA/north-central OR onion participants)
Lindsey du Toit
Associate Professor of Plant Pathology, Washington State University,
Email: dutoit@wsu.edu, 360-848-6140

Disease & Pest Update

thrips

RECENT REPORTS of New Disease and Pest Problems-1

 

DISEASE / PEST ALERTS

[Updated 04/11/2012]   Send Additional Published Reports to H. F. Schwartz @ howard.schwartz@colostate.edu

2012

IYSV (Iris yellow spot virus) in India [Mandal et al., Plant Dis. 96:468-479]

IYSV & Thrips (Frankliniella fusca) transmission [Srinivasan et al., J. Econ. Ent. 105:40-47]

Leaf and Neck Anthracnose (Colletotrichum coccodes) in Michigan [Rodriguez-Salamanca et al., Plant Dis. 96:769]

Skin Blotch & Bulb Canker (Embellisia allii) in California [Koike & Rooney-Latham, Plant Dis. 96:291]

TSWV (Tomato spotted wilt virus) on onion & garlic in Serbia [Stankovic et al., Plant Dis. 96: First Look]

Yellow Bud Leaf Blight (Pseudomonas species) in Georgia [Gitaitis et al., Plant Dis. 96:285]

 

2011

Bacterial Leaf Spot (Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri) in Korea [Myung et al., Plant Dis. 95:1311]

Botrytis Leaf Blight (Botrytis squamosa) in Canada [Carisse et al., Plant Dis. 95:504-514]

Enterobacter Bulb Decay (Enterobacter cloacae) in New York [Zaid et al., Plant Dis. 95:1581]

Garlic Virus (Garlic virus X) in India [Baranwai et al., Plant Dis. 95:1197]

IYSV (Iris yellow spot virus) in India [Kunkalikar et al., Phytopathology 101:367-376]

IYSV in Egypt [Hafez et al., Plant Dis. 95:594]

IYSV sources in New York [Hsu et al., Plant Dis. 95:735-743]

IYSV in Kenya and Uganda [Birithia et al., Plant Dis. 95:1195]

IYSV in onion relatives [Cramer et al., Plant Dis. 95:1319]

IYSV indicator host [Srinivasan et al., Plant Disease 95:1520-1527]

IYSV in Mexico [Velasquez-Valle & Reveles-H., Rev. Mex. de Cien. Agri. 2:971-978]

IYSV  & Thrips (Thrips tabaci) epidemiology [Smith et al., Env. Ent. 40:194-203]

Phytophthora Bulb Rot (Phytophthora nicotianae) in New Mexico [French et al., Plant Dis. 95:1028]

Shallot Virus (Shallot latent  virus) in Brazil [Mituti et al., Plant Dis. 95:227]

Thrips (various species) as vectors of Tospoviruses [Riley et al., J.  IPM DOI: 10.1603/IPM10020]