June 23, 2017

Howard Schwartz – Colorado State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

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STATE COMMENTARY
October 8, 2012 by hschwartz
Colorado Commentary (10-08-12)  COLORADO Onion harvest of transplanted onions (during August to September) and seeded onions (during September to October) resulted generally in average to above average yields due to light to moderate pest and disease pressure throughout the state.  High temperature and low moisture stress did contribute to higher incidences of Pink Root and Fusarium basal rot in fields of susceptible varieties, but bacterial and fungal disease pressure was light; followed by low to moderate pressure from IYSV in some fields.  Storage rot should not be an issue for the high quality bulbs that are going to storage and market.

Howard Schwartz – Colorado State Commentary Onion ipmPIPE

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CO Commentary (06-14-12)

 

COLORADO Commentary

Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 06/14/12

Warm, dry conditions persist throughout Colorado, with few reports of any storm damage occurring in onion regions. Thrips pressure continues to build in Eastern, Southern and Western Regions of the state. Pink Root confirmed in southern Colorado (6 %); and beet armyworm was recovered from all 5 plant samples in western Colorado.

Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 06/14/12

The northern region has received very little rain in recent weeks, and other regions of the state received less than 0.25 inches or no rain. Temperatures have averaged in the mid 80 to low 90s during the day, and low to mid 50s in the evening.

Temperature Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Above Normal

Precipitation Outlook* [2 – 4 weeks]: Below Normal

*Courtesy of Planalytics, Inc.

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/14/12

Thrips – Initial surveys in the northern region detected 3 to 28 (larvae + adult) in northern, 10 in southern and 6 thrips / plant in western regions on transplants or seeded.

Maggots – No surveys or reports at this time

Other – Beet armyworm recovered from 5 of 5 plant samples on the west slope.

Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 06/14/12

Iris yellow spot virus – IYSV not detected in surveys of transplanted or seeded onions sampled in southern, northern and southern regions at this time.

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium) – Pink Root was confirmed in 6 % of seeded onions sampled in southern Colorado, but no reports from northern or southern regions at this time.

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis) – No surveys or reports at this time

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots) – No surveys or reports at this time

State Contact for Project Howard Schwartz Professor of Plant Pathology Colorado State University Email:howard.schwartz@colostate.edu

Collaborators: Whitney Cranshaw, Ned Tisserat, Stephanie Szostek, Janet Hardin,

Mike Bartolo, Thad Gourd, Bob Hammon, Colorado Onion Association

Dan Drost – Utah State Commentary – Onion ipmPIPE

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Utah Commentary 4-20

Utah Commentary
Onion Crop Growth Stage and Status Last Modified: 04/20/12
Onion production occurs in Utah only in Davis, Weber and Box Elder counties. Exceptionally good field conditions in March ensured that all seeded onions were planted by March 24. Growers with transplants (approx 150 acres) began transplanting in mid-April and completed those operations within a week. Field conditions good throughout the late March and early April periods with sufficient moisture to ensure good to excellent emergence. Plant stands some of the best in memory.
Weather Impacts (temperature, rain, hail, freezing) Last Modified: 04/20/12
The northern Utah has received some rain in last two weeks. More than one inch rain occurred during the last two weeks providing sufficient moisture for good early growth. No freezing temperatures experienced. Overall temperature conditions about normal with days in 50-60’s and nights in 35-45’s. No damaging weather related events in last two weeks.

Insect Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 04/20/12

Thrips

No surveys or reports at this time

Maggots
No surveys or reports at this time

Other
No surveys or reports at this time
Disease Scouting, Outlook and Management Last Modified: 04/20/12

Iris yellow spot virus
No surveys or reports at this time

Soil-borne Diseases (Damping Off, Pink Root, Fusarium)
No surveys or reports at this time

Fungal Diseases (purple blotch, downy mildew, Botrytis)
No surveys or reports at this time

Bacterial Diseases (Xanthomonas, center rot, soft rots)
No surveys or reports at this time

Onion Specialist Daniel Drost Professor of Horticulture Utah State University Email: dan.drost@usu.edu

Howard Schwartz – Colorado

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September 15, 2011 Lower temperatures and rain occurred in most onion regions, and may contribute to late-season problems with bacterial and fungal diseases in the field and storage. aggravate some late-season fungal problems in seeded fields.